THE MOTOR
October 8th 2012
Integrating art in architecture

|“For me it was very important not to attach something purely decorative onto something structural. I sat down with my team and we decided that we wanted to create a great facade while also solving the obscuring problem of having columns throughout the thing. We came up with what appears to be a space-filling grid principle, but it is also structurally active. This created a fertile ground for integrating art into the architecture, so that a certain sort of seamlessness started to develop between the two. It isn’t always easy to create this close relationship where art and architecture achieve such a degree of integration. It is not seamless simply in terms of where the metal bars meet each other—it’s more of an ideological seamlessness”. Left: Harpa, Iceland and R: Mikroskop, Berlin Architecture Olafur Eliasson

“For me it was very important not to attach something purely decorative onto something structural. I sat down with my team and we decided that we wanted to create a great facade while also solving the obscuring problem of having columns throughout the thing. We came up with what appears to be a space-filling grid principle, but it is also structurally active. This created a fertile ground for integrating art into the architecture, so that a certain sort of seamlessness started to develop between the two. It isn’t always easy to create this close relationship where art and architecture achieve such a degree of integration. It is not seamless simply in terms of where the metal bars meet each other—it’s more of an ideological seamlessness”. Left: Harpa, Iceland and R: Mikroskop, Berlin Architecture Olafur Eliasson

THE MOTOR
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